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  • Government Name: Kenneth Key
  • Register Number: A70562
  • Age:57
  • Time Served:33 years
  • Home Town:Chicago, IL
  • Sentence:888 years (Natural Life)
  • Current Charge:Armed Robbery, Kidnapping
  • Alias:Blue & Ananyah Ben Yisrael
  • Release Date:N/A
  • Prison Affiliation:N/A
  • Circle of Influence:Jamel Miller
  • Institution:Stateville Correctional Center
  • You will rise in direct proportion to the decrease in your negative thoughts, words and actions
  • African Hebrew Israelites and Redemptive Struggle in Prison

    Young brothers enter prison and become curious about religion and various spiritual paths. 30 brothers meet upstairs in the gym at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois) to gain understanding about Hebrew Israelites and the Hebraic way of life. Once a month we have a question and answer in the spirit of universal brotherhood and righteousness. The aim is to give all in search of redemption practical things they can do, as well as historical information on our identity and... READ MORE

  • Saggin’

    The following is a guest post written by Roosevelt Wilder while at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois). Wilder has since been transferred to Danville Correctional Center (Danville, Illionis) where he is serving a 60-year sentence for murder. He has been incarcerated since 1995. Fruit of the loom Saggin’ from the ass of the fruit of the womb. Ashy backs and ass cracks Sadly, howling at the moon, Doomed . . . before they could learn to eat with a spoon Consumed . . . by the... READ MORE

  • The Harsh Reality of Prison

    Kevin King, known as KK, has just been convicted of Armed Robbery and sentenced to 65 years in prison. KK is 24 years-old. He must serve 85% of his 65-year sentence, which will make him about 70 when he is released from prison. KK is an only child, no nieces, nephews, cousins, uncles, or aunts. His mother is on crack and the streets raised him. Once KK hits the jail most of the streets abandoned him. His homies disappeared. His girlfriend left. He could no longer provide the funds and good... READ MORE

  • When does forgiveness begin and dehumanization stop?

    “Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.” -Johan Wolfgang von Goethe “Continue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering.” -Hebrews 13:13 I want to take a moment to define I’ve shared a quote in a previous post by my friend and author J. Doyle what is meant by dehumanization- to divest of human qualities or personality.  This process... READ MORE

  • The Real: Prisoners discuss use of the N-word

    I attend a class here at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, IL) called Further Learning/Creative Writing. The class consists of reading various great authors and writing what got out of and think about the literature. We read Black Boy by Richard Wright and discussed it in class. In particular, the use of the word nigger and question of who can and cannot use the word. Out of this discussion was born a conversation with a young brother by the name of Toney Cole R-47028. Tony is 31-years... READ MORE

  • Dealing With Death in Prison: When it All Hits You at Once

    The worst news anyone can wake up to in prison is the death of his mother. My mother died on June 30, 2016. And to top it off, I did not learn of her death through the prison administration. Nope, it didn’t happen that way! Something told me to call a woman who has been in my life twenty years and I consider my wife. Unbeknownst to me, she was on her way to the prison, a route she has driven many, many times over the years. She almost lost her life in several near-miss accidents and now... READ MORE

  • Words of Encouragement for My African Queens and Daughters

    Painting by Live from Lockdown contributor Kenneth Key, incarcerated at Stateville Correctional Center (Illinois Department of Corrections). I want to talk to my young queens, my sisters, my daughters, who have been scarred by past relationships. Every day I think of you and just want to convey some words of encouragement. It’s my prayer that my words will ignite some soul traveling and increase your belief in self. A belief that many of you have lost. I am aware that when you settle for... READ MORE

  • A Mother’s Letter to Her Son in Prison

    Ms. Irene Best is a young black mother who at the age of thirteen was taken advantage of and gave birth to Jason Best. At the age of eighteen, Jason left her in a flash due to a series of crimes that would get him Natural Life in prison. A year after Jason’s incarceration she wrote him this letter.  Dear Jason, The day you were born, I myself was yet a child, thirteen-years-old. I looked at you and smiled, knowing that moment forward God had blessed me. Despite all the obstacles we... READ MORE

  • Doing LIFE in Prison: What Will be My Legacy?

    I wake each morning to the profound reality of doing LIFE in prison. Now, having served over 34 years of my life in prison, guilty or innocent, this is not what I or any man was created for. But here I am in a box, caged like an animal, and often, as the tours come through, I am looked upon as such. Yes, a man, human no less, but looked at as other than and treated inhumanely; the wretch of the earth. I have a friend who wrote a book titled A Costly American Hatred. His name is Joseph Dole. In... READ MORE

  • Prison Shakedown

    Photo by Busterrr In a cellhouse at Stateville Correctional Center (Joiliet, Illinois). Awakened by a prisoner who was up early and noticed the water, including toilets, had been cutoff – the signs of a soon to come prison shakedown. It’s a level one shakedown. It’s statewide, which means officers from the thirty-plus prisons in Illinois will converge upon us to search for contraband such as knives, homemade wine, drugs, phones, etc. There are over 400 officers. Inmates are... READ MORE

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >
  • African Hebrew Israelites and Redemptive Struggle in Prison

    Young brothers enter prison and become curious about religion and various spiritual paths. 30 brothers meet upstairs in the gym at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois) to gain understanding about Hebrew Israelites and the Hebraic way of life. Once a month we have a question and answer in the spirit of universal brotherhood and righteousness. The aim is to give all in search of redemption practical things they can do, as well as historical information on our identity and... READ MORE

  • Saggin’

    The following is a guest post written by Roosevelt Wilder while at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois). Wilder has since been transferred to Danville Correctional Center (Danville, Illionis) where he is serving a 60-year sentence for murder. He has been incarcerated since 1995. Fruit of the loom Saggin’ from the ass of the fruit of the womb. Ashy backs and ass cracks Sadly, howling at the moon, Doomed . . . before they could learn to eat with a spoon Consumed . . . by the... READ MORE

  • The Harsh Reality of Prison

    Kevin King, known as KK, has just been convicted of Armed Robbery and sentenced to 65 years in prison. KK is 24 years-old. He must serve 85% of his 65-year sentence, which will make him about 70 when he is released from prison. KK is an only child, no nieces, nephews, cousins, uncles, or aunts. His mother is on crack and the streets raised him. Once KK hits the jail most of the streets abandoned him. His homies disappeared. His girlfriend left. He could no longer provide the funds and good... READ MORE

  • When does forgiveness begin and dehumanization stop?

    “Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.” -Johan Wolfgang von Goethe “Continue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering.” -Hebrews 13:13 I want to take a moment to define I’ve shared a quote in a previous post by my friend and author J. Doyle what is meant by dehumanization- to divest of human qualities or personality.  This process... READ MORE

  • The Real: Prisoners discuss use of the N-word

    I attend a class here at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, IL) called Further Learning/Creative Writing. The class consists of reading various great authors and writing what got out of and think about the literature. We read Black Boy by Richard Wright and discussed it in class. In particular, the use of the word nigger and question of who can and cannot use the word. Out of this discussion was born a conversation with a young brother by the name of Toney Cole R-47028. Tony is 31-years... READ MORE

  • Dealing With Death in Prison: When it All Hits You at Once

    The worst news anyone can wake up to in prison is the death of his mother. My mother died on June 30, 2016. And to top it off, I did not learn of her death through the prison administration. Nope, it didn’t happen that way! Something told me to call a woman who has been in my life twenty years and I consider my wife. Unbeknownst to me, she was on her way to the prison, a route she has driven many, many times over the years. She almost lost her life in several near-miss accidents and now... READ MORE

  • Words of Encouragement for My African Queens and Daughters

    Painting by Live from Lockdown contributor Kenneth Key, incarcerated at Stateville Correctional Center (Illinois Department of Corrections). I want to talk to my young queens, my sisters, my daughters, who have been scarred by past relationships. Every day I think of you and just want to convey some words of encouragement. It’s my prayer that my words will ignite some soul traveling and increase your belief in self. A belief that many of you have lost. I am aware that when you settle for... READ MORE

  • A Mother’s Letter to Her Son in Prison

    Ms. Irene Best is a young black mother who at the age of thirteen was taken advantage of and gave birth to Jason Best. At the age of eighteen, Jason left her in a flash due to a series of crimes that would get him Natural Life in prison. A year after Jason’s incarceration she wrote him this letter.  Dear Jason, The day you were born, I myself was yet a child, thirteen-years-old. I looked at you and smiled, knowing that moment forward God had blessed me. Despite all the obstacles we... READ MORE

  • Doing LIFE in Prison: What Will be My Legacy?

    I wake each morning to the profound reality of doing LIFE in prison. Now, having served over 34 years of my life in prison, guilty or innocent, this is not what I or any man was created for. But here I am in a box, caged like an animal, and often, as the tours come through, I am looked upon as such. Yes, a man, human no less, but looked at as other than and treated inhumanely; the wretch of the earth. I have a friend who wrote a book titled A Costly American Hatred. His name is Joseph Dole. In... READ MORE

  • Prison Shakedown

    Photo by Busterrr In a cellhouse at Stateville Correctional Center (Joiliet, Illinois). Awakened by a prisoner who was up early and noticed the water, including toilets, had been cutoff – the signs of a soon to come prison shakedown. It’s a level one shakedown. It’s statewide, which means officers from the thirty-plus prisons in Illinois will converge upon us to search for contraband such as knives, homemade wine, drugs, phones, etc. There are over 400 officers. Inmates are... READ MORE

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >
  • African Hebrew Israelites and Redemptive Struggle in Prison

    Young brothers enter prison and become curious about religion and various spiritual paths. 30 brothers meet upstairs in the gym at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois) to gain understanding about Hebrew Israelites and the Hebraic way of life. Once a month we have a question and answer in the spirit of universal brotherhood and righteousness. The aim is to give all in search of redemption practical things they can do, as well as historical information on our identity and... READ MORE

  • Saggin’

    The following is a guest post written by Roosevelt Wilder while at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois). Wilder has since been transferred to Danville Correctional Center (Danville, Illionis) where he is serving a 60-year sentence for murder. He has been incarcerated since 1995. Fruit of the loom Saggin’ from the ass of the fruit of the womb. Ashy backs and ass cracks Sadly, howling at the moon, Doomed . . . before they could learn to eat with a spoon Consumed . . . by the... READ MORE

  • The Harsh Reality of Prison

    Kevin King, known as KK, has just been convicted of Armed Robbery and sentenced to 65 years in prison. KK is 24 years-old. He must serve 85% of his 65-year sentence, which will make him about 70 when he is released from prison. KK is an only child, no nieces, nephews, cousins, uncles, or aunts. His mother is on crack and the streets raised him. Once KK hits the jail most of the streets abandoned him. His homies disappeared. His girlfriend left. He could no longer provide the funds and good... READ MORE

  • When does forgiveness begin and dehumanization stop?

    “Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.” -Johan Wolfgang von Goethe “Continue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering.” -Hebrews 13:13 I want to take a moment to define I’ve shared a quote in a previous post by my friend and author J. Doyle what is meant by dehumanization- to divest of human qualities or personality.  This process... READ MORE

  • The Real: Prisoners discuss use of the N-word

    I attend a class here at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, IL) called Further Learning/Creative Writing. The class consists of reading various great authors and writing what got out of and think about the literature. We read Black Boy by Richard Wright and discussed it in class. In particular, the use of the word nigger and question of who can and cannot use the word. Out of this discussion was born a conversation with a young brother by the name of Toney Cole R-47028. Tony is 31-years... READ MORE

  • Dealing With Death in Prison: When it All Hits You at Once

    The worst news anyone can wake up to in prison is the death of his mother. My mother died on June 30, 2016. And to top it off, I did not learn of her death through the prison administration. Nope, it didn’t happen that way! Something told me to call a woman who has been in my life twenty years and I consider my wife. Unbeknownst to me, she was on her way to the prison, a route she has driven many, many times over the years. She almost lost her life in several near-miss accidents and now... READ MORE

  • Words of Encouragement for My African Queens and Daughters

    Painting by Live from Lockdown contributor Kenneth Key, incarcerated at Stateville Correctional Center (Illinois Department of Corrections). I want to talk to my young queens, my sisters, my daughters, who have been scarred by past relationships. Every day I think of you and just want to convey some words of encouragement. It’s my prayer that my words will ignite some soul traveling and increase your belief in self. A belief that many of you have lost. I am aware that when you settle for... READ MORE

  • A Mother’s Letter to Her Son in Prison

    Ms. Irene Best is a young black mother who at the age of thirteen was taken advantage of and gave birth to Jason Best. At the age of eighteen, Jason left her in a flash due to a series of crimes that would get him Natural Life in prison. A year after Jason’s incarceration she wrote him this letter.  Dear Jason, The day you were born, I myself was yet a child, thirteen-years-old. I looked at you and smiled, knowing that moment forward God had blessed me. Despite all the obstacles we... READ MORE

  • Doing LIFE in Prison: What Will be My Legacy?

    I wake each morning to the profound reality of doing LIFE in prison. Now, having served over 34 years of my life in prison, guilty or innocent, this is not what I or any man was created for. But here I am in a box, caged like an animal, and often, as the tours come through, I am looked upon as such. Yes, a man, human no less, but looked at as other than and treated inhumanely; the wretch of the earth. I have a friend who wrote a book titled A Costly American Hatred. His name is Joseph Dole. In... READ MORE

  • Prison Shakedown

    Photo by Busterrr In a cellhouse at Stateville Correctional Center (Joiliet, Illinois). Awakened by a prisoner who was up early and noticed the water, including toilets, had been cutoff – the signs of a soon to come prison shakedown. It’s a level one shakedown. It’s statewide, which means officers from the thirty-plus prisons in Illinois will converge upon us to search for contraband such as knives, homemade wine, drugs, phones, etc. There are over 400 officers. Inmates are... READ MORE

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >
  • African Hebrew Israelites and Redemptive Struggle in Prison

    Young brothers enter prison and become curious about religion and various spiritual paths. 30 brothers meet upstairs in the gym at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois) to gain understanding about Hebrew Israelites and the Hebraic way of life. Once a month we have a question and answer in the spirit of universal brotherhood and righteousness. The aim is to give all in search of redemption practical things they can do, as well as historical information on our identity and... READ MORE

  • Saggin’

    The following is a guest post written by Roosevelt Wilder while at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, Illinois). Wilder has since been transferred to Danville Correctional Center (Danville, Illionis) where he is serving a 60-year sentence for murder. He has been incarcerated since 1995. Fruit of the loom Saggin’ from the ass of the fruit of the womb. Ashy backs and ass cracks Sadly, howling at the moon, Doomed . . . before they could learn to eat with a spoon Consumed . . . by the... READ MORE

  • The Harsh Reality of Prison

    Kevin King, known as KK, has just been convicted of Armed Robbery and sentenced to 65 years in prison. KK is 24 years-old. He must serve 85% of his 65-year sentence, which will make him about 70 when he is released from prison. KK is an only child, no nieces, nephews, cousins, uncles, or aunts. His mother is on crack and the streets raised him. Once KK hits the jail most of the streets abandoned him. His homies disappeared. His girlfriend left. He could no longer provide the funds and good... READ MORE

  • When does forgiveness begin and dehumanization stop?

    “Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.” -Johan Wolfgang von Goethe “Continue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering.” -Hebrews 13:13 I want to take a moment to define I’ve shared a quote in a previous post by my friend and author J. Doyle what is meant by dehumanization- to divest of human qualities or personality.  This process... READ MORE

  • The Real: Prisoners discuss use of the N-word

    I attend a class here at Stateville Correctional Center (Joliet, IL) called Further Learning/Creative Writing. The class consists of reading various great authors and writing what got out of and think about the literature. We read Black Boy by Richard Wright and discussed it in class. In particular, the use of the word nigger and question of who can and cannot use the word. Out of this discussion was born a conversation with a young brother by the name of Toney Cole R-47028. Tony is 31-years... READ MORE

  • Dealing With Death in Prison: When it All Hits You at Once

    The worst news anyone can wake up to in prison is the death of his mother. My mother died on June 30, 2016. And to top it off, I did not learn of her death through the prison administration. Nope, it didn’t happen that way! Something told me to call a woman who has been in my life twenty years and I consider my wife. Unbeknownst to me, she was on her way to the prison, a route she has driven many, many times over the years. She almost lost her life in several near-miss accidents and now... READ MORE

  • Words of Encouragement for My African Queens and Daughters

    Painting by Live from Lockdown contributor Kenneth Key, incarcerated at Stateville Correctional Center (Illinois Department of Corrections). I want to talk to my young queens, my sisters, my daughters, who have been scarred by past relationships. Every day I think of you and just want to convey some words of encouragement. It’s my prayer that my words will ignite some soul traveling and increase your belief in self. A belief that many of you have lost. I am aware that when you settle for... READ MORE

  • A Mother’s Letter to Her Son in Prison

    Ms. Irene Best is a young black mother who at the age of thirteen was taken advantage of and gave birth to Jason Best. At the age of eighteen, Jason left her in a flash due to a series of crimes that would get him Natural Life in prison. A year after Jason’s incarceration she wrote him this letter.  Dear Jason, The day you were born, I myself was yet a child, thirteen-years-old. I looked at you and smiled, knowing that moment forward God had blessed me. Despite all the obstacles we... READ MORE

  • Doing LIFE in Prison: What Will be My Legacy?

    I wake each morning to the profound reality of doing LIFE in prison. Now, having served over 34 years of my life in prison, guilty or innocent, this is not what I or any man was created for. But here I am in a box, caged like an animal, and often, as the tours come through, I am looked upon as such. Yes, a man, human no less, but looked at as other than and treated inhumanely; the wretch of the earth. I have a friend who wrote a book titled A Costly American Hatred. His name is Joseph Dole. In... READ MORE

  • Prison Shakedown

    Photo by Busterrr In a cellhouse at Stateville Correctional Center (Joiliet, Illinois). Awakened by a prisoner who was up early and noticed the water, including toilets, had been cutoff – the signs of a soon to come prison shakedown. It’s a level one shakedown. It’s statewide, which means officers from the thirty-plus prisons in Illinois will converge upon us to search for contraband such as knives, homemade wine, drugs, phones, etc. There are over 400 officers. Inmates are... READ MORE

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
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  • >

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